Lasting Power of Attorney

Making a lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) allows you to choose the person or people to make decisions on your behalf.

What does a Lasting Power of Attorney do?

Making a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) allows you to choose the person or people to make decisions on your behalf. There are two types of LPA; Personal Welfare which appoints someone to deal with medical treatment or where you should be living and a separate LPA for Financial Affairs which appoints someone to look after your finances and property.

 

What happens if I cannot make decision and I don’t have an LPA?

If you lose mental capacity without an LPA your loved ones will need to apply to the Court of Protection to appoint a deputy to manage your affairs for you. This is a long and expensive process.

 

Who do I appoint as my Attorney?

You can appoint one or more attorney’s to act for you, and you can determine if they work together or separately to make decisions on your behalf.

 

Do I lose control of my bank accounts and other affairs?

You do not suddenly give up control. You can choose whether the LPA can be used either before, or only if at any point, you lose mental capacity. For example, if you fall into a coma, your Attorney would start looking after your affairs. When you are able to, you would then make your own decisions again.

 

When should I set up my LPA?

Sooner rather than later. Dementia and strokes are often associated with older people but an accident or illness can happen at any time – whatever your age. Without an LPA it can take the Court of Protection between 6 and 12 months to appoint a deputy.

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